STABILIZE HOUSING: GUARANTEE RENT NOW

cliff edge 3
Sign the petition

March 31, 2020:- For many people in Massachusetts, tomorrow rent is due. Some will face a very tough choice. Why?

Because today is the seventh day since Governor Baker’s business-closure order took effect.  At the stroke of a pen, approximately 150,000 people had their jobs and livelihoods taken away (albeit with the best of intentions on the part of the Governor).

People are hurting. For a lot of us, renters and home-owners alike, it feels like we are about to fall off a cliff.

What happens when people cannot afford to pay rent?

In this emergency, no landlord would want to ask the Housing Court to evict a tenant for nonpayment of rent. And now many do not have that option anyway, even for tenants who are still in work and can afford to pay rent. Why?

Because today is also the fifth day since Congress passed the CARES Act, which (among other things) imposes a 4-month moratorium on evictions from residential properties with federally-backed mortgages. For the applicable language, scroll down to page 574 and read Section 4024(a)(4) and (5).

In the coming months, more and more people are going to face hardship and the appalling choice between food and rent. I know which one I would choose.

There will be a handful–there always is–of those who can pay but won’t; those who will take advantage, safe in the knowledge that if they live in a property with a federally backed mortgage the landlord must not send them a notice to quite, let alone ask a judge to evict them.

So who is going to pay for the cost of housing people who can’t (or won’t) pay rent?

Who is going to pay the landlord’s employees and contractors, the people who keep rental homes fit to live in?

Sign the petition

Again, most of us know that the Governor has the best of intentions in issuing the orders that are causing businesses to close down and shed workers. That’s a given. But when it creates a problem, government has a responsibility to fix it. Here’s one way, and if you agree please sign the petition.

The Commonwealth should immediately stand as surety for renters who cannot afford to pay rent. A surety bond is a guarantee that if one party to a contract does not perform its obligations (e.g. fails to make timely payments) an outsider will pick up some or all of the tab so that the other party to the contract does not lose out.

In order to safeguard homes during and after the emergency, the Legislature needs to act now and issue surety bonds.

If you think that the Commonwealth as a whole should stabilize housing by guaranteeing rents via surety bonds, sign the petition today.

Tell the Legislature to keep us from falling off that cliff.

Act now to stabilize rental housing

March 27, 2020:-  Here’s my video asking people to sign the petition that asks Massachusetts lawmakers to stabilize housing by guaranteeing the rent.

As I mention in the video, this is day 17 of the state of emergency and only four days have passed since the Governor issued the executive order closing all “non-essential” businesses. As a result, unemployment in Massachusetts has gone up 1,900%.

For my description of the proposal and its rationale, please see my previous post.

By the way, in the video I wonder whether we will look back on state government’s response as proper or as Operation Barn Burner. I’m using the term “barn burner” in its 19th-century sense, i.e. someone who will rid the barn of rats by burning it down, akin to journalist Peter Arnett’s phrase that he attributed to an officer in the US Army, “destroy the village to save it” (which phrase no officer may have actually uttered).

Click here to sign the petition.

Chamber legislative breakfast_with Lindsey and Silvia (3)
Peter Vickery, Esq.

Calling on State Government to Guarantee Rents

I am inviting you to sign a petition, and here’s why:

“No one should fear losing their home because of the coronavirus,” HUD Secretary Ben Carson tweeted on March 18.

Well said, ditto that, and hear hear. The same principle should apply to renters and owners alike. No one who provides homes should fear losing them because of the coronavirus.

Without a doubt, Governor Baker and our other elected officials in Massachusetts have been attempting, in good faith, to protect the public by flattening the curve. But the cumulative effect of the orders has been devastating to the livelihoods of thousands.

I am not a landlord, but I have represented quite a few over the years (some tenants too) and know that they depend on rent checks to pay their bills. When tenants can’t pay landlords, landlords can’t pay the next people along in the chain of obligations, e.g. the cleaners, plumbers, carpenters, roofers, and electricians who keep tenants’ homes up to code.

Many tenants are losing their jobs and can’t pay rent, and the ripple effects are obvious.

Even if, looking back, it turns out that these measures really did help slow the spread of COVID 19, it is already clear that they have inflicted massive damage on families across Massachusetts. And things are likely to get worse before they get better. The Economic Policy Institute projects 125,000 job losses in Massachusetts by the summer.

People are out of work and unable to pay rent as a direct result of our State government’s response to COVID 19. Acting under the authority that the Legislature granted in 1950, the Governor issued a series of executive orders.

Again, most of us know that the Governor has the best of intentions in issuing the orders that are causing businesses to close down and shed workers. That’s a given. But when it creates a problem, government has a responsibility to fix it. Here’s one way, and if you agree please sign the petition:

Surety Bonds

The Commonwealth should immediately stand as surety for renters who now—because of those executive orders—cannot afford to pay rent. It was the Governor—not landlords—who issued those orders, and it was the Legislature—not landlords—that granted the Governor the legal authority to issue them.

In order to safeguard homes during and after the emergency, the Legislature needs to act now and issue surety bonds.

A surety bond is a guarantee that if one party to a contract does not perform its obligations (e.g. fails to make timely payments) an outsider will pick up some or all of the tab so that the other party to the contract does not lose out. It is a way to insure against loss. Some insurance companies offer this kind of product to landlords.

But now is hardly the time to try to buy surety bonds. The peril is already manifest. Instead, in the interests of social cohesion and stability, State government needs to act as insurer and guarantee the rent. After all, this is not an instance of market failure, but rather government failure.

If you agree that the Commonwealth of Massachusetts needs to guarantee rental payments during this crisis, please sign this petition.

The Massachusetts Legislature can make this happen. Our Constitution vests the sole authority to initiate money bills, the so-called power of the purse, in the House of Representatives, and the Speaker of the House should act immediately. He has the power to push the necessary legislation through.

Sign the Petition

COVID 19 has thrown us a curve ball, and we all — owners and renters alike — are in need of one heck of a batter.

Mr. Speaker, you’re up.

To call on the Speaker to issue surety bonds to guarantee people’s rent, sign the petition today.

Landlord jumped the gun, says SJC

March 23, 2020:- What a difference a day makes. Today’s decision from the Supreme Judicial Court (SJC) in Youghal, LLC v. Entwistle reminds landlords that they need to prove receipt (not merely the sending) of a notice to quit and that they can only commence summary process for non-payment of rent after 14 days have elapsed.

In the Youghal case, the landlord’s agent taped the notice to quit for non-payment of rent to the tenants’ door on June 6, 2017. But at trial one tenant testified that she did not see the notice until the following day, June 7. The landlord served the tenants with a summary process summons and complaint on June 21, 2017, which within the 14-day period that commenced on June 7 (the day the tenant said she saw it). Therefore, said the SJC today, “judgment must enter for the tenants.”

Chamber legislative breakfast_with Lindsey and Silvia (3)
Peter Vickery, Esq.

Civil Asset Forfeiture

March 6, 2020:- Civil asset forfeiture is a way for law-enforcement agencies to acquire property (money, vehicles, real estate, etc.) from people who have not been charged with, let alone convicted of, any crime. If somebody — anybody — used the property, or even just intended to use it, in the commission of a drug crime, the government can take the property, sell it, and keep the proceeds, and all without the rigmarole of a trial.

Under Massachusetts law, G.L. c. 94C, sec. 47(d), if the Commonwealth establishes probable cause (not a very high bar) the burden is on the owner to prove that the property is not forfeitable.

For example, one case in Tewksbury involved local and federal agencies trying to take a motel that had been in the same family for two generations. The reason? Over the course of 14 years during which the owners had rented out rooms approximately 200,000 times there had been 14 drug-related arrests on the premises. There was no suggestion that the owners themselves had done anything wrong.

As an editorial Massachusetts Lawyers Weekly in 2019 stated:

All of this makes it too easy for property to be confiscated, and creates incentives for police and prosecutors to use forfeiture as a way to target those without the ability to fight a seizure. The law can also lead to unintended consequences, such as putting elderly parents or minor children living in a target’s house at risk for homelessness.

I am committed to helping reform the these laws, and am working with other concerned citizens to raise awareness and organize for change.

In the meantime, if law enforcement is trying to obtain your property through forfeiture, email/call me for a free 30-minute consult.

Tel. 413.992.2915  Email: peter@petervickery.com

 

PeterVickery_1 sitting
Peter Vickery, Esq.

New MCAD decisions published

March 4, 2020:- The Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination (MCAD) has published three new decisions (link).

One of the cases (Chase, et al v. Crescent Yacht Club, et al) involves an award of attorney’s fees and cots in the amount of approximately $83,000.00 on top of a damages award of almost $30,000.00.

PeterVickery_6 standing
Peter Vickery, Esq.

School district’s insurer pays $90K after firing of teacher who took time off to care for toddler son with stage IV cancer

March 3, 2020:-  What a headline, eh. Anti-discrimination laws protect not only employees with disabilities but also employees whose family members have disabilities (“associational discrimination”). This story from the North Andover Eagle-Tribune describes a case where the Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination (MCAD) found probable cause.

PeterVickery_6 standing
Peter Vickery, Esq.